Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://olympias.lib.uoi.gr/jspui/handle/123456789/18281
Full metadata record
DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorTsouli, S.en
dc.contributor.authorKyritsis, A. P.en
dc.contributor.authorTsagalis, G.en
dc.contributor.authorVirvidaki, E.en
dc.contributor.authorVemmos, K. N.en
dc.date.accessioned2015-11-24T18:51:36Z-
dc.date.available2015-11-24T18:51:36Z-
dc.identifier.issn1423-0208-
dc.identifier.urihttps://olympias.lib.uoi.gr/jspui/handle/123456789/18281-
dc.rightsDefault Licence-
dc.subjectAgeden
dc.subjectAphasia/*etiology/mortality/therapyen
dc.subjectCause of Deathen
dc.subjectCohort Studiesen
dc.subjectFemaleen
dc.subjectGlasgow Coma Scaleen
dc.subjectGreece/epidemiologyen
dc.subjectHospitalizationen
dc.subjectHumansen
dc.subjectHypertension/complications/epidemiologyen
dc.subjectKaplan-Meier Estimateen
dc.subjectMaleen
dc.subjectProportional Hazards Modelsen
dc.subjectProspective Studiesen
dc.subjectRisk Factorsen
dc.subjectStroke/*complications/mortality/therapyen
dc.subjectTreatment Outcomeen
dc.titleSignificance of aphasia after first-ever acute stroke: impact on early and late outcomesen
heal.typejournalArticle-
heal.type.enJournal articleen
heal.type.elΆρθρο Περιοδικούel
heal.identifier.primary10.1159/000222091-
heal.identifier.secondaryhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19494550-
heal.identifier.secondaryhttp://content.karger.com/ProdukteDB/produkte.asp?doi=10.1159/000222091-
heal.languageen-
heal.accesscampus-
heal.recordProviderΠανεπιστήμιο Ιωαννίνων. Σχολή Επιστημών Υγείας. Τμήμα Ιατρικήςel
heal.publicationDate2009-
heal.abstractBACKGROUND: We assessed the incidence and determinants of aphasia attributable to first-ever acute stroke. We also investigated early and long-term mortality and 1-year dependence in post-stroke patients. METHODS: A 10-year prospective hospital-based study was conducted in the prefecture of Athens, Greece. RESULTS: In total, 2,297 patients were included in the study, of whom 806 (35.1%) had aphasia. The presence of aphasia was independently associated with increasing age (OR: 1.19 per 10-year increase, 95% CI: 1.12-1.21) and atrial fibrillation (OR: 1.35, 95% CI: 1.08-1.67), and inversely associated with Scandinavian Stroke Scale (SSS) score (OR: 0.55 per 10-point increase, 95% CI: 0.52-0.59) and hypertension (OR: 0.77, 95% CI: 0.63-0.96). One-year dependence score (calculated with the modified Rankin score) was higher in aphasic patients compared to non-aphasics (p < 0.001). Moreover, severity of aphasia (estimated with a subscale of SSS) was found as an independent predictor of 1-year dependence. Most of the deaths in the aphasic patients were attributed to infections and neurological damage. Using the Kaplan-Meier limit method, the unadjusted probability of 10-year mortality was demonstrated to increase with the severity of aphasia (log-rank test: 233.9, p < 0.001) and, even after adjustment for several other factors, severity of aphasia remained an independent predictor of 10-year mortality. CONCLUSIONS: Increasing age, atrial fibrillation and severity of stroke were associated with the risk of aphasia after stroke. Severity of aphasia is a strong predictor of long-term mortality and dependence of post-stroke patients.en
heal.journalNameNeuroepidemiologyen
heal.journalTypepeer-reviewed-
heal.fullTextAvailabilityTRUE-
Appears in Collections:Άρθρα σε επιστημονικά περιοδικά ( Ανοικτά)

Files in This Item:
There are no files associated with this item.


This item is licensed under a Creative Commons License Creative Commons