Bcl-2 affects survival but not neuronal differentiation of PC12 cells (Journal article)

Batistatou, A./ Merry, D. E./ Korsmeyer, S. J./ Greene, L. A.


Past studies have shown that serum-free cultures of PC12 cells are a useful model system for studying the mechanisms of neuronal death after neurotrophic factor deprivation. These cultures, as well as NGF-deprived cultures of sympathetic neurons, manifest and endonuclease activity that leads to "apoptotic" internucleosomal DNA cleavage. Overexpression of the proto-oncogene bcl-2 blocks apoptotic death in various cell types. To study the actions of this protein in neuronal cells, we derived PC12 cell lines stably transfected with a cDNA encoding human bcl-2. It is reported here that lines expressing high levels of the exogenous bcl-2 protein are protected from both death and apoptotic DNA fragmentation caused by removal of trophic support. However, expression of high levels of exogenous bcl-2 neither mimics nor interferes with promotion of neurite outgrowth by NGF.
Institution and School/Department of submitter: Πανεπιστήμιο Ιωαννίνων. Σχολή Επιστημών Υγείας. Τμήμα Ιατρικής
Keywords: Animals,Blotting, Northern,Blotting, Western,Cell Differentiation/drug effects/*physiology,Cell Survival/drug effects/*physiology,Humans,Kinetics,Nerve Growth Factors/pharmacology,Neurons/*cytology/metabolism,PC12 Cells,Protein-Tyrosine Kinases/metabolism,Proto-Oncogene Proteins/analysis/biosynthesis/*metabolism,Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-bcl-2,*Proto-Oncogenes,RNA/analysis,RNA, Messenger/biosynthesis/metabolism,Recombinant Proteins/analysis/biosynthesis/metabolism,Time Factors,Transfection
URI: http://olympias.lib.uoi.gr/jspui/handle/123456789/23529
ISSN: 0270-6474
Link: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7692014
Appears in Collections:Άρθρα σε επιστημονικά περιοδικά ( Ανοικτά)

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