Detailed molecular and clinical investigation of a child with a partial deletion of chromosome 11 (Jacobsen syndrome) (Journal article)

Manolakos, E./ Orru, S./ Neroutsou, R./ Kefalas, K./ Louizou, E./ Papoulidis, I./ Thomaidis, L./ Peitsidis, P./ Sotiriou, S./ Kitsos, G./ Tsoplou, P./ Petersen, M. B./ Metaxotou, A.

BACKGROUND: Jacobsen syndrome (JBS) is a rare chromosomal disorder leading to multiple physical and mental impairment. This syndrome is caused by a partial deletion of chromosome 11, especially subband 11q24.1 has been proven to be involved. Clinical cases may easily escape diagnosis, however pancytopenia or thrombocytopenia may be indicative for JBS. RESULTS: We report a 7.5 years old boy presenting with speech development delay, hearing impairment and abnormal platelet function. High resolution SNP oligonucleotide microarray analysis revealed a terminal deletion of 11.4 Mb in size, in the area 11q24.1-11qter. This specific deletion encompasses around 170 genes. Other molecular techniques such as fluorescence in situ hybridization and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification were used to confirm the array-result. DISCUSSION: Our results suggest that the identification and detailed analysis of similar patients with abnormal platelet function and otherwise mild clinical features will contribute to identification of more patients with 11q deletion and JBS.
Institution and School/Department of submitter: Πανεπιστήμιο Ιωαννίνων. Σχολή Επιστημών Υγείας. Τμήμα Ιατρικής
URI: https://olympias.lib.uoi.gr/jspui/handle/123456789/22574
ISSN: 1755-8166
Link: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20003197
http://www.molecularcytogenetics.org/content/pdf/1755-8166-2-26.pdf
Appears in Collections:Άρθρα σε επιστημονικά περιοδικά ( Ανοικτά)

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